The Masculinity of Jesus Part 3 (baptism and temptation)

The Baptism of Jesus is spoken about in all 4 gospels, but it is only described specifically in 3 of them. John is only a general commentary. Only Matthew provides dialogue of what Jesus’s actions and commentary.

For ease of reading I’m going to underline the actual spoken aspects.

Part 1 — the baptism of Jesus

Matthew 3:13 Then Jesus *arrived from Galilee at the Jordan coming to John, to be baptized by him. 14 But John tried to prevent Him, saying, “I have need to be baptized by You, and do You come to me?” 15 But Jesus answering said to him, “Permit it at this time; for in this way it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he *permitted Him. 16 After being baptized, Jesus came up immediately from the water; and behold, the heavens were opened, and [i]he saw the Spirit of God descending as a dove and [j]lighting on Him, 17 and behold, a voice out of the heavens said, “This is [k]My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.

Mark 1:9 In those days Jesus came from Nazareth in Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. 10 Immediately coming up out of the water, He saw the heavens [g]opening, and the Spirit like a dove descending upon Him; 11 and a voice came out of the heavens: “You are My beloved Son, in You I am well-pleased.

Luke 2:21 Now when all the people were baptized, Jesus was also baptized, and while He was praying, heaven was opened, 22 and the Holy Spirit descended upon Him in bodily form like a dove, and a voice came out of heaven, “You are My beloved Son, in You I am well-pleased.

John 1:29 The next day he *saw Jesus coming to him and *said, “Behold, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world! 30 This is He on behalf of whom I said, ‘After me comes a Man who [t]has a higher rank than I, for He existed before me.’ 31 I did not recognize [u]Him, but so that He might be manifested to Israel, I came baptizing [v]in water.” 32 John testified saying, “I have seen the Spirit descending as a dove out of heaven, and He remained upon Him. 33 I did not recognize [w]Him, but He who sent me to baptize [x]in water said to me, ‘He upon whom you see the Spirit descending and remaining upon Him, this is the One who baptizes [y]in the Holy Spirit.’ 34 I myself have seen, and have testified that this is the Son of God.

Mark and Luke only briefly cover the baptism by stating that Jesus was baptized and then the heavens opened and the Father talked about His Son Jesus.

John’s testimony talks about what happened before Jesus’ baptism when he saw him coming, and his testimony afterward of what had happened about John the Baptist’s witness.

Thus, I’m mostly going to examine Matthew here.

Matthew 3:13 Then Jesus *arrived from Galilee at the Jordan coming to John, to be baptized by him. 14 But John tried to prevent (diakōluō) Him, saying, “I have need to be baptized by You, and do You come to me?” 15 But Jesus answering said to him, “Permit (aphiēmi) it at this time; for in this way it is fitting (prepō) for us to fulfill all righteousness (dikaiosunē).” Then he *permitted (aphiēmi) Him. 16 After being baptized, Jesus came up immediately from the water; and behold, the heavens were opened, and [i]he saw the Spirit of God descending as a dove and [j]lighting on Him, 17 and behold, a voice out of the heavens said, “This is [k]My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.

The first thing about this passage is that John attempts to prevent Jesus from being baptized and rather would be baptized by Jesus. The word used here is diakōluō:

G1254 — διακωλύω — diakōluō — dee-ak-o-loo’-o

From G1223 and G2967; to hinder altogether, that is, utterly prohibit: – forbid

This is a much stronger word than the NASB translation. Basically, John wanted absolutely no part of baptizing Jesus. This will tie into what the analysis of the baptism later.

Secondly, Jesus replies back to John telling him to “permit it” or the KJV “suffer [it to be so].” The word used here is aphiēmi:

G863 — ἀφίημι — aphiēmi — af-ee’-ay-mee

From G575 and ἵημι hiēmi (to send; an intensive form of εἶμι eimi (to go)); to send forth, in various applications: – cry, forgive, forsake, lay aside, leave, let (alone, be, go, have), omit, put (send) away, remit, suffer, yield up.

This is the primary word in the gospels which is used for forgiveness [of sins]. For example, in the Lord’s prayer: Matthew 6:12 ‘And forgive (aphiēmi) us our debts, as we also have forgiven (aphiēmi) our debtors. Likewise, it is the same word used when the disciples were called and left (aphiēmi) their nets to follow Jesus.

Thus, as Jesus said it is properly fitting for this to occur because it parallels his whole ministry which is His sacrifice for us for the forgiveness of sins.

The word for fitting in this case is prepō.

G4241 — πρέπω — prepō — prep’-o

Apparently a primary verb; to tower up (be conspicuous), that is, (by implication) to be suitable or proper (third person singular present indicative, often used impersonally, it is fit or right): – become, comely.

This word is only used 7 times in the NT, and it is used in terms of what is fitting for the saints to do in Christ in avoidance of fornication and other sins (Eph 5), what it is fitting for women to do (1 Cor 11, 1 Tim 2, Titus 2), and in Jesus’ fitting sacrifice for us (Heb 2, Heb 6).

The most interesting aspect of this word is the conspicuous nature of it. Baptism is indeed a public declaration of being a follower of Jesus. Likewise, baptism and communion are one of the few things that Jesus commanded us to do as believers, and they are two examples of public declarations of our faith in Him. Christianity has always been about faith in action, and this is no exception.

Finally, the word used for righteousness is dikaiosunē.

G1343 — δικαιοσύνη — dikaiosunē — dik-ah-yos-oo’-nay

From G1342; equity (of character or act); specifically (Christian) justification: – righteousness.

This word is only used for righteouness in the NT, and one of the most prominent examples is when Jesus states “seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness (dikaiosunē) and all these things shall be added unto you.”

This synergizes with the word fitting above, as baptism is symbolic of dying to self and becoming a new creation in Christ.

This is the interaction between Jesus and John:

But John tried to prevent (diakōluō) Him, saying, “I have need to be baptized by You, and do You come to me?”

15 But Jesus answering said to him, “Permit (aphiēmi) it at this time; for in this way it is fitting (prepō) for us to fulfill all righteousness (dikaiosunē).”

The dialogue shows that Jesus knows what must occur in His mission, and therefore does not allow John to stop him from it. There is some element of truth in John’s words: John does need baptism from Jesus, but it is only a half truth. Jesus needed to be baptized to foreshadow and fulfill what He had come to earth to perform.

John is operating under an example of false humility in this case. His concern is not for what Jesus desires — the One who he claimed was greater than He and whose sandals he was not worthy to untie. But rather, he is concerned for himself and his unworthiness to baptize Jesus.

It’s very easy for humans to be persuaded or convinced into half truths. Half truths seems like the full truth, but they have underlying elements of pride or other sins hidden within them which corrupt them fully.

One example of this is compliments to women. Of course, it is a good thing to compliment a woman. But the context in which it is performed matters significantly. In the post Her emotions, it is very easy for husbands to fall into the trap of complimenting a wife when she asks for it. Husbands fall into this trap because they understand that complimenting their wife is good, but they fail to realized that a woman fishing for a compliment is doing it out of her own pride or self esteem. Building up that which is selfish is not godly and indeed will not direct her towards the truth which is God.

Jesus’ example to John here is one of rooting out false humility and to direct John on the path to do the right thing. The same thing should be done with both men and women.

Godly men should not validate selfishness, pride, or false humility.

Part 2 — the temptation of Jesus

The temptation of Jesus is only present in Matthew, Mark, and Luke.

Matthew 4:1 Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. 2 And after He had fasted forty days and forty nights, He [a]then became hungry. 3 And the tempter came and said to Him, “If You are the Son of God, command that these stones become bread.” 4 But He answered and said, “It is written, ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God.’” 5 Then the devil *took Him into the holy city and had Him stand on the pinnacle of the temple, 6 and *said to Him, “If You are the Son of God, throw Yourself down; for it is written, ‘He will command His angels concerning You’; and ‘On their hands they will bear You up, So that You will not strike Your foot against a stone.’” 7 Jesus said to him, “[b]On the other hand, it is written, ‘You shall not put the Lord your God to the test.’” 8 Again, the devil *took Him to a very high mountain and *showed Him all the kingdoms of the world and their glory; 9 and he said to Him, “All these things I will give You, if You fall down and [c]worship me.” 10 Then Jesus *said to him, “Go, Satan! For it is written, ‘You shall worship the Lord your God, and [d]serve Him only.’” 11 Then the devil *left Him; and behold, angels came and began to minister to Him.

Mark 1:12 Immediately the Spirit *impelled Him to go out into the wilderness. 13 And He was in the wilderness forty days being tempted by Satan; and He was with the wild beasts, and the angels were ministering to Him.

Luke 4:Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led around [a]by the Spirit in the wilderness 2 for forty days, being tempted by the devil. And He ate nothing during those days, and when they had ended, He became hungry. 3 And the devil said to Him, “If You are the Son of God, tell this stone to become bread.” 4 And Jesus answered him, “It is written, ‘Man shall not live on bread alone.’” 5 And he led Him up and showed Him all the kingdoms of [b]the world in a moment of time. 6 And the devil said to Him, “I will give You all this domain and [c]its glory; for it has been handed over to me, and I give it to whomever I wish. 7 Therefore if You [d]worship before me, it shall all be Yours.” 8 Jesus answered him, “It is written, ‘You shall worship the Lord your God and serve Him only.’” 9 And he led Him to Jerusalem and had Him stand on the pinnacle of the temple, and said to Him, “If You are the Son of God, throw Yourself down from here; 10 for it is written, ‘He will command His angels concerning You to guard You,’ 11 and, ‘On their hands they will bear You up, So that You will not strike Your foot against a stone.’” 12 And Jesus answered and said to him, “It is said, ‘You shall not put the Lord your God to the test.’” 13 When the devil had finished every temptation, he left Him until an opportune time.

The passage in Mark is only a brief commentary. The Matthew and Luke passages are identical, except for the reversal of the 2nd and 3rd temptations.

This article is really long already and the Greek is not particularly illuminating for these passages as it is straight forward.

The most important thing to take note is the solid frame which Jesus presents to Satan. In a sense, frame as used in terms of game is about maintaining integrity to yourself. However, as Christians we are not called to maintain integrity towards ourselves but rather instead towards our Creator.

Satan: “If You are the Son of God, command that these stones become bread.”
Jesus: “It is written, ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God.’”

Satan: “If You are the Son of God, throw Yourself down; for it is written, ‘He will command His angels concerning You’; and ‘On their hands they will bear You up, So that You will not strike Your foot against a stone.’”
Jesus: “[b]On the other hand, it is written, ‘You shall not put the Lord your God to the test.’”

Satan: “All these things I will give You, if You fall down and [c]worship me.”
Jesus: “Go, Satan! For it is written, ‘You shall worship the Lord your God, and [d]serve Him only.’”

In this passage, Jesus shows an impregnable frame against the first and greatest temptor, Satan. Jesus is not wishy washy, but He knows who He is in God and will not compromise on what He knows is right. This is the same mentality that we as Christians should have towards one another.

God’s message to the Church in Laodicea in Revelation 3 can be directed straight at Christian nice guys:

Revelation 3: 15 ‘I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot; I wish that you were cold or hot. 16 So because you are lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I will [l]spit you out of My mouth. 17 Because you say, “I am rich, and have become wealthy, and have need of nothing,” and you do not know that you are wretched and miserable and poor and blind and naked,

The common saying “If you don’t know what you stand for then you don’t stand for anything” is indeed true in regard to our interactions with both men and women. And to Christian women specifically being a wishy washy man, one who is an amorphous nice guy, is a surefire way to be unattractive.

This aspect of masculinity is the strong, courageous, decisive, opinionated, and disciplined personality that Christian men need to foster within themselves to be men of God.

It is important to be true to God, rather than be true to yourself.

Part 3 — Conclusions

The main themes of masculinity within the baptism of Jesus, and the temptation of Jesus are the following:

  • Jesus is not afraid of reframing the attitude of John (John’s false humility) in order to foreshadow and fulfill the path that was set before Him.
  • Jesus is not afraid to stand up the temptor, Satan, and reframe the entire interaction from “how can Jesus give into his own desires” into “how can Jesus stay true to what God desires.”

These are important points because in each case the strength and courage of personality shine through in Jesus’ interactions with John and Satan. One meant for good, and one meant for evil; however, similar in their nature of interaction.

Jesus time and time again demonstrates the impregnability of his frame in his interactions with women, men, and non-human beings. He knows His mission and who He is serving, and is thus decisive, strong, courageous, opinionated, and disciplined in His personality to do what He was called to perform here on this earth. This shines forth in all of his interactions.

May the grace of God be on our lives as we aspire to become masculine men like Jesus.

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23 Responses to The Masculinity of Jesus Part 3 (baptism and temptation)

  1. Chad says:

    “This synergizes with the word fitting above, as baptism is symbolic of dying to self and becoming a new creation in Christ.”

    I think this is the first scripture I disagree with you on, as I’ve never heard of baptism being symbolic of dying to self and don’t view it that way. Rather, it is simply placing a soul on the path of God by washing away original sin, which is not the same as death to self. Most churches and denominations implicitly agree with this, considering it of utmost importance that babies be baptized as young as possible, but considering them inherently saved until they’re beyond the age of reason.

    As such, I see confirmation as the first Death of Self, as one is beyond the age of reason, has undergone religious instruction, and is confirming an actual choice to follow Christ by their own free will and actions.

    You can see this difference reflected in scripture with the Pentecost and the descent of the Holy Spirit enacting the confirmation of the Apostles, at which time they understand Christ’s teachings where before they often were described as hearing his words, but never having understood.

    So, here’s where that difference leads me in terms of Godly Masculinity.

    Baptism is what allows the Holy Spirit to enter us at all, as with original sin upon our souls God -cannot- enter. Thus why baptism is so vital. As men, this entrance of the Holy Spirit into our souls is what allows us to hold frame, because having God within us allows us to be a part of God’s will. The Holy Spirit allows us to be a force of God just as we are men of God. We see this as God goes and, with the Holy Spirit with him after baptism, he goes into the wilderness and holds the greatest frame we see against the Devil himself. As he’s God, all of his actions are pure confirmation of God’s Will, so we never really see confirmation of Christ, though we do in the Apostles. For us today, the original act of confirmation greatly increases and focuses the Holy Spirit within us to the amount of which we are in personal submission to God’s authority. After the rite of confirmation, each additional ACT of confirmation further increases our adherence to God, opens our hearts and souls wider to his Will, and allows God to enter into us to further degrees. As this occurs, we become more and more powerful forces of God as we become more humble and serving of him, growing in graces and all the virtues. Mirroring that, each time we sin, each time we wrongfully submit to men or women, we drive the Holy Spirit out of us as it cannot be where there is sin, and we lose our Godly Masculinity to the degree of the sin.

    Let me know what you think.

  2. @ Chad

    I disagree. This may be one of the places where we disagree because of background of Protestants and Catholics.

    I don’t believe in child baptism, nor do I see any evidence of why it should be there except as seen in Church tradition. I was in a church previously and was baptized as an infant, but I don’t think it means anything. That’s why I was baptized again once I had fully made the choice to serve God. But indeed Sola Scriptura is full of problems as well.

    What I was taught is that baptism is symbolic for entering the grave as Christ did, dying to self, and emerging out of the water a new Creation in Him.

    There is Scriptural support for this as laid out by Paul in Romans 6:

    What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin so that grace may increase? 2 May it never be! How shall we who died to sin still live in it? 3 Or do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus have been baptized into His death? 4 Therefore we have been buried with Him through baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life. 5 For if we have become [a]united with Him in the likeness of His death, certainly we shall also be [b]in the likeness of His resurrection, 6 knowing this, that our old [c]self was crucified with Him, in order that our body of sin might be [d]done away with, so that we would no longer be slaves to sin; 7 for he who has died is [e]freed from sin.

    I’m not exactly familiar with the differences between confirmation and baptism, so that may be part of it. But I think that the Scripture from Romans supports it enough.

  3. @ Chad,

    I just read the wiki on confirmation and it says the Scriptural support for this is:

    Acts 8:14 Now when the apostles in Jerusalem heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent them Peter and John, 15 who came down and prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit. 16 For He had not yet fallen upon any of them; they had simply been baptized [e]in the name of the Lord Jesus. 17 Then they began laying their hands on them, and they were receiving the Holy Spirit.

    So it seems baptism is not necessarily synonymous with receiving the Holy Spirit, although it was in the case of Jesus (Spirit descending like a dove and resting on Him).

    That said, we also know that baptism is not the same as salvation.

    Romans 10 NASB

    8 But what does it say? “The word is near you, in your mouth and in your heart”—that is, the word of faith which we are preaching, 9 [e]that if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved; 10 for with the heart a person believes, [f]resulting in righteousness, and with the mouth he confesses, [g]resulting in salvation. 11 For the Scripture says, “Whoever believes in Him will not be [h]disappointed.” 12 For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; for the same Lord is Lord of all, abounding in riches for all who call on Him; 13 for “Whoever will call on the name of the Lord will be saved.”

    It seems to me that being saved is different from baptism which is also different from receiving the Holy Spirit. Although baptism and receiving the Holy Spirit can occur simultaneously.

    I’m really not sure what to make of this at this current juncture.

  4. Chad says:

    The difference between confirmation and baptism vary wildly from denomination to denomination. Some don’t recognize confirmation, and some do. Some see confirmation simply like they do a high school diploma, and of less importance. The Catholic and Orthodox churches, as far as I know, hold it of higher importance than any other denominations.

    They describe it much as I just did. That it is a sacrament of God which increases the closeness of our relationship with him. Neither see it as ‘necessary’ for salvation technically, though both Catholic and Orthodox describe it as greatly beneficial as it is an acknowledgement of a completed basic religious education upon which the Holy Spirit can help further grow the fruits involved in the intellect and wisdom in particular, but increase all the gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit.

    As you say, there are more scriptural references to Baptism, and most denominations see it as utmost importance (though not all in these days, sadly). Baptism removes original sin and, as stated in your Romans, removes those sins.

    Confirmation simply goes further with a formal invitation and blessing of a priest for the Holy Spirit to fully enter the individual. Different denominations do it differently (if at all) but Catholic rite has an annointation of the head and heart that the Holy Spirit would bless and enter into the intellect and soul more fully through a formal act confirming adherence to Christian beliefs and practices.

    The Evangelical church I grew up held the same kind of views of separate baptism and confirmation…. though they were much, much more lax with everything. Much more ‘saved by faith’ than works, but still believing in baptism and confirmation as separate rites. They simply didn’t do any blessed oil and confirmation was more of a…. 10 week religious class on Sundays that all 16 year olds went through than any real rite.

    Many Protestant churches, such as yours, take away confirmation, don’t do child baptism, and do adult baptism. As far as I can tell, they’re merging the two practices into one and calling it baptism while ignoring any confirmation.

    With passages such as the one you cited, I haven’t seen any that speak against child baptism as they describe it as merely a washing away of original sin, which requires no choice. After the age of reason, further sins may be committed which would condemn one to hell.

  5. Chad says:

    I forgot that part of Acts, as I haven’t studied it specifically in any depth and most of my religious training revolving around confirmation involved the descent of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost, where the apostles were gifted with tongues, laid their hands upon those people, and converted many of the crowd. If you remember when Christ breathed on the apostles upon his resurrection, the Catholic church sees that as the start of the first confirmation of the Apostles. They receive the breath of God (the Holy Spirit) and it breathes the life of the Holy Spirit into them.

    Sorry, it’s been a whirlwind of three months since I started going through Catholic confirmation where all this was discussed and then I went through the rite itself. I forgot about things that are small, but important. The breathing and laying on of hands are vastly important, and I remembered the oil of all things. Mostly because people I meet still refer to it as such when I tell them when I was confirmed. Our Deacon just yesterday, when he learned, literally said, “Wow. That recently? Hah! The oil is still on your head, isn’t it?”

  6. @ Chad

    Many Protestant churches, such as yours, take away confirmation, don’t do child baptism, and do adult baptism. As far as I can tell, they’re merging the two practices into one and calling it baptism while ignoring any confirmation.

    Based on what I see from this generalized thing on confirmation:

    “Confirmation is a rite of initiation in several Christian denominations,[1] normally carried out through anointing, the laying on of hands, and prayer, for the purpose of bestowing the Gift of the Holy Spirit.”

    I know that my current church does laying of hands, prayer, and commissioning directly after baptism. For us it does seem folded into one as opposed to ignoring confirmation completely.

    You also may know this already but the Holy (hagios) Spirit (pneuma) is indeed air/breath/blast:

    G4151 — πνεῦμα — pneuma — pnyoo’-mah

    From G4154; a current of air, that is, breath (blast) or a breeze; by analogy or figuratively a spirit, that is, (human) the rational soul, (by implication) vital principle, mental disposition, etc., or (superhuman) an angel, daemon, or (divine) God, Christ’s spirit, the Holy spirit: – ghost, life, spirit (-ual, -ually), mind. Compare G5590.

    Perhaps not unironic that we are sustained by breath, or every word that comes from the mouth of God.

  7. Chad says:

    Yep. What you describe seems fairly typical in terms of the folding two into one. I find such interesting when they are clearly two different acts. It leads to men and women, such as yourself, that don’t have any training or reference to confirmation. To be fair, even my evangelical church that did separate them didn’t train at all on what confirmation was as taught by scripture.

    And people wonder why Christianity is in shambles. It’d help if they taught it to begin with. Confirmation isn’t the more dire teaching, but to say that it isn’t influential when it lead to the conversion and deepening of faith of many does it a disservice while ignoring God’s rites and wishes for those that follow him to grow in faith by fully receiving the Holy Spirit with full understanding of the act and it’s importance.

  8. @ Chad

    I think the bigger shambles are Revelation 2 and 3 to which describes the myriad of the ways Christians are led astray, especially in today’s day and age.

    A lack of confirmation does seem to hurt some churches in some ways, although I question how much it does. From reading through the manosphere at least from what I’ve seen that is the most important is:

    Matthew 5:6 Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

    Matthew 6:33 But [a]seek first [b]His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be [c]added to you.

    Those who do will mature as Christians regard of denomination.

  9. Chad says:

    Fair enough. I’ve long ago decided that I believe Catholicism to be the best denomination for reliably leading people, but that I have no idea to the mystery of how God operates in terms of denominational beliefs. I merely live my life, and will let others decide if they see benefit to my particular way of following Christ, while answer questions if they have them

  10. donalgraeme says:

    I guess I should interject myself at this point. Confirmation and Baptism were, for the early Church (although past the time of the original Apostles), normally synonymous. One was Baptized and then there was the laying of hands, all done by the local Bishop (Overseer). The separation of the rites began when the church grew so much that Bishop’s couldn’t baptize everyone themselves. Thus began the practice of confirming the Baptism after the fact by the Bishop when he had time to finally meet the new convert.

  11. @ Chad

    I think the problem is that it’s very difficult to discern what it means to serve God zealously versus what is too legalistic. There’s a balance in there somewhere, whereas on the other end of things you have the spectrum of being less legalistic but too lukewarm or compromising.

    I think it’s hard for most Christians to see what is what, though with faith in action in serving others it’s difficult to go wrong.

    The problem from what I’ve seen is that most in the Church are not serving on a regular basis, and it is one of the things that I think the Catholic church does a lot better than the Prots. Especially in regard to Charity in regard to the poor and widows.

    It has made me consider converting, though I believe God has led me to my current Church after much prayer. It’s clear as day that there has been fruit in my life already from how I’ve been growing.

    All around I think God tends to put different people in different places to serve for a particular reason. Though we may not know for what reason and why.

  12. @ Donal

    Interesting. I didn’t know that either. Thanks for the enlightenment.

  13. donalgraeme says:

    You are welcome Deep Strength. Something to keep in mind about this subject is that many of these practices were fully developed long before the New Testament was finalized around 400 AD. So much of this is based off of Tradition, and not written Scripture.

  14. padre98 says:

    Keep in mind, there is also the Martyr’s Baptism, which is why Christ questioned his followers if they could have the baptism he was going to have.

    Do agree, Jesus knew what he was about, knew Scriptures, he was not going to be moved from doing what he knew he had to do..what he was sent for..the Son who went to the vineyard, he knew what he was facing.

    That to me is the take away, this is the lesson, he was not going to be moved off of doing what he was sent to do..period. In relation to Game, or better said, interpersonal relationships, know what one is about and get to doing it..do not be double minded

  15. @ Padre

    Yep. it’s the lukewarm, amorphous, niceness garbage that men need to be cleansed of.

  16. @DS:

    The “balance” is Wisdom from the Spirit. Something wholly lacking from the modern Church.

  17. Pingback: Husbands win their wives with words | Reflections on Christianity and the manosphere

  18. Pingback: It is so easy to do, create a formula for success. Part 4 of ? | A voice in the wilderness

  19. infowarrior1 says:

    Water baptism is not essential for the baptism of the holy spirit:

    Luke 23:39-43
    39One of the criminals who were hanged railed at him,d saying, “Are you not the Christ? Save yourself and us!” 40But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? 41And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong.” 42And he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” 43And he said to him, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise.”

    However it is part and parcel of the early church and is a declaration of faith.

  20. @ infowarrior

    Thanks. Good catch on that the water baptism.

  21. infowarrior1 says:

    @Deep Strength

    Thanks.

    Will you allow me the quibble of correcting your grammar?

    Instead of:
    “Thanks. Good catch on that the water baptism.”

    this:
    “Thanks. Good catch on the water baptism”

  22. @ Info

    Haha. Not the first time, and certainly won’t be the last. When I reply quick my fingers sometimes type words that aren’t supposed to be there.

  23. Pingback: Nazarene Commentary Mark 1:9-11 – An Approved Son Baptized | Belgian Biblestudents - Belgische Bijbelstudenten

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