Non-standard political analysis

This will probably be my last politically oriented post.

In a couple of interesting election stats, I posted that 94% of evangelicals, 88% of mainline Protestants, and 81% of Catholics would vote for Trump over Clinton.

In general, the “most” divisive issues on why Christians voted for Trump over Clinton are probably these three that I mentioned previously: Abortion, Marriage, and Religious liberty. These are from the Manhattan Declaration:

Manhattan Declaration is a movement of Orthodox, Catholic, and Evangelical Christians for life, marriage, and religious liberty.

These are the issues that most likely pushed most Evangelicals, mainline Protestants, and Catholics to vote Trump over Clinton.

Firstly, I believe marriage to be a red herring (and the real issue to the Church is divorce). However, I also think marriage has a non-standard solution that would improve current divisiveness: the government should get out of the marriage business.

It’s pretty clear that most Christians think that marriage is a moral/religious decision, and most people think that marriage should be for anyone think it’s a human right. This is a hotbed topic that will come to the forefront of almost every election now that SCOTUS has legalized gay marriage.

Although the government getting out of the marriage business won’t solve any issues between Christians (and/or other religions that support marriage between a man-woman) and non-Christians, it would quell one of the main hotbed topics. People are then free to do what they choose, which is the whole point of free will. We know what Christians will choose, and we know what non-Christians will choose.

It’s foolish to expect non-Christians to adhere to Christian values, but this would push the issue further out of the limelight and make it easier to preach the gospel (in my opinion).

Secondly, although abortion has been legalized for a long time, it’s still a hotbed topic. Half of the issue is that abortion is allowed at all (for very conservative Christians), and the other half of the issue is that every democratic candidate keeps pushing government sponsored contraception and abortion (for most other Christians).

I think that most Christians know that Roe vs Wade is not actually going away, despite the crying of Hillary supporters to the contrary. Therefore, pragmatically and realistically the actual “battle” is about using taxpayer money for abortifacient contraception and abortions.

The democrats are greedy for taxpayer money to support their issues, which is why is why this is a thoroughly divisive topic in the first place. If the democrats cared about garnering a greater percentage of the from the Christian community, removing taxpayer money from paying for abortifacient contraception and abortions would be a good step.

This is much in the same way as marriage. People are then free to do what they choose, which is the whole point of free will. We know what Christians will choose, and we know what non-Christians will choose. It is just that Christians wouldn’t have to pay for “morally reprehensible” actions.

It’s foolish to expect non-Christians to adhere to Christian values, but this would push the issue further out of the limelight and make it easier to preach the gospel (in my opinion).

Thirdly, religious liberty. This issue will never go away, and has no simple answer unlike the other topic topics. What is currently happening is that “religious liberty” is butting against what many people feel is “basic human rights.”

A large part of this issue is tied to the topic of marriage. Christian bakers, florists, photographers, and so on being forced to pay fines and suffer sanctions or participate in gay weddings. If the government got out of the marriage business, it would potentially necessarily stop legislation of private and/or religious practices. If marriage was a private and/or religious practice, this issue would be significantly less divisive than it already is because it would be more out of the political limelight.

As it is right now, there are tons of bakers, florists, photographers, and so on who support gay marriage. People who want a gay marriage need only to go to them to have these services rendered. However, as we have seen, it’s not about getting services provided but rather enforcing all others to believe the same things you do.

This is the reason why I think that this topic will never really go away. Marriage exemplifies this, but marriage is only one part of it. If you remove marriage from the equation, something else will pop up instead of marriage as the dividing topic. The reason for this is the continual equivocation of gay marriage to things like segregation.

Finally, even though I think two of the three hotbed topics can be resolved somewhat, the real ultimate reason for the divide between Christians and non-Christians is the difference in moral values. To quote from a previous post:

I think that the fact people get upset at political stances is very interesting. If they didn’t care they would be apathetic, but they do care which means they get upset when others disagree with them. I think that this is a good thing because people do want to be engaged when it comes to how they are being governed and the values instituted in the various systems and powers that be.

Unfortunately, people’s value systems are all out of whack. It’s obvious that non-Christians will vote according to their “own” system of morality given they don’t have an anchored reality point. However, even many Christians are ignorant, deceived, or foolish when it comes to basing their “truth” on what they feel rather than God’s Truth.

The mess you get yourself into is of your own doing, whether in ignorance, deception, or foolishness. It’s up to you to take steps to excavate yourself from the ditch — in conjunction with God’s grace and mercy — and it always involves humility and repentance. Such things are in short supply.

When you have a series of absolute moral values set by God butting up against moral relativism. There is always going to be hatred.

John 15:18 “If the world hates you, [e]you know that it has hated Me before it hated you. 19 If you were of the world, the world would love its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, because of this the world hates you. 20 Remember the word that I said to you, ‘A slave is not greater than his master.’ If they persecuted Me, they will also persecute you; if they kept My word, they will keep yours also. 21 But all these things they will do to you for My name’s sake, because they do not know the One who sent Me. 22 If I had not come and spoken to them, they would not have [f]sin, but now they have no excuse for their sin. 23 He who hates Me hates My Father also. 24 If I had not done among them the works which no one else did, they would not have [g]sin; but now they have both seen and hated Me and My Father as well. 25 But they have done this to fulfill the word that is written in their Law, ‘They hated Me without a cause.’

26 “When the [h]Helper [or Comforter] comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, that is the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify about Me, 27 [i]and you will testify also, because you have been with Me from the beginning.

The Holy Spirit was sent specifically for the purpose of helping and comforting, when the world hates Christians and persecutes them.

This is why I don’t support political parties or candidates, even though I may vote. The only hope is Jesus.

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10 Responses to Non-standard political analysis

  1. Also relevant: Evangelicals are highly motivated by dislike for Clinton rather than support for Trump

    She symbolizes much that runs against their beliefs: abortion rights advocacy, feminism and, conversely, a rejection of biblical ideas of femininity and womanhood. Perhaps even more significantly, Hillary Clinton, as an outspoken and activist first lady, is inextricably tied in the minds of conservative Christians to their loss of the culture war battles beginning with Bill Clinton’s first term in 1993.

    Michael Cromartie, director of a program on evangelicals and civic life at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, said that whenever he hears justification of Trump support, it is almost always couched as a way to keep Hillary Clinton from the presidency. Three-quarters of evangelicals cited dislike for Clinton as a major reason they support Trump, according to a recent Pew Research poll.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/acts-of-faith/wp/2016/10/09/the-deep-disgust-for-hillary-clinton-that-drives-so-many-evangelicals-to-support-trump/

  2. And the working class:

  3. I am not an American but am relieved that Hillary didn’t win. Trump isn’t a saint but I have learnt about what damage the Obama administration had done to traditional families, marriages and children (in education). Hillary as President will be more of the same, if not worse.

    And as an indication of how well the propaganda machine was being run in this “grand culture war”, people around me (including my wife whom I later explained why Trump was better for the US and even the world) were in absolute disgust and dismay about the election results. Many of them are Christians. None of them are US citizens; they were gunning for Hillary.

    I take comfort in God’s Word because it stands against anything (including lies) that the world and its principalities throw at us. There may be attempts at creatively changing the words in the various iterations of translations and versions, but it behooves us to study diligently so that we may not be misled.

    On one hand, we know that things will get worse (from the Book of Revelations) in all aspects of our lives as Christians. On the other, we can take comfort that God will bring justice to this world.

    So thanks for the reminder in this post especially the verses in the Gospel of John.

  4. Zhou says:

    I would have voted for Trump if I was an American. Of the top of my head, the first reason would be, women aren’t as strong leaders as men (Voddie Baucham pointed out that when God judges a nation, he appoints women leaders). Two, she’s just pure evil, it seems. All her lies, exposing state secrets, etc…. Three, feminism, abortion, and making things even harder for men to get a foothold.

  5. feeriker says:

    I would have voted for Trump if I was an American. Of the top of my head, the first reason would be, women aren’t as strong leaders as men (Voddie Baucham pointed out that when God judges a nation, he appoints women leaders). Two, she’s just pure evil, it seems. All her lies, exposing state secrets, etc…. Three, feminism, abortion, and making things even harder for men to get a foothold.

    That Hitlary is so obviously demonic is why I’m absolutely floored that anyone who considers themselves a genuine Christian would ever even think of supporting her, or even tolerating her. To be brutally honest, I immediately and strongly question the “Christian” credentials of anyone who would vote for or support her. The REAL HItlary is simply too well known, everywhere in the world, for there to be any excuse for ignorance.

  6. @ feeriker

    That Hitlary is so obviously demonic is why I’m absolutely floored that anyone who considers themselves a genuine Christian would ever even think of supporting her, or even tolerating her. To be brutally honest, I immediately and strongly question the “Christian” credentials of anyone who would vote for or support her. The REAL HItlary is simply too well known, everywhere in the world, for there to be any excuse for ignorance.

    That’s why I was stunned when it seemed like a large chunk of my Church was crying on facebook that Trump won. I don’t like either candidate, but one is worse than the other.

    1. Ignorance/ignoring the platforms, even after my pastor went through them in 4 sermons no less.

    2. Looking only at the bad character of Trump when Hillary’s character is as bad (but most likely worse).

    3. Cheap grace, basically. “At least LGBT marriages are based on love” (paraphrased) is one of the things I saw written.

    4. Only concerned about how they “feel” rather than what is good for the nation.

  7. Novaseeker says:

    One of the confounding things is that this is really a religious conflict, primarily.

    I don’t mean that it’s a conflict between “progressive” and “orthodox” kinds of Christians. But rather, it’s a conflict between (primarily) “orthodox” believers, on the one hand, and believers in secular progressivism which is , in effect, a non-theistic religion, complete with its own orthodoxies, its own clerisy (the Academy, “experts”), scriptures (peer-reviewed “studies”), encyclicals (mainstream media), moral rules (tolerance, diversity), clearly defined evil (patriarchy, tradition, white identity, theistic religion) and an eschatological perspective (great arc of history bending towards an ever more progressive ultimate future)

    This is why when Clinton lost, the supporters were so distraught. It’s not a political reaction, but a religious one. It’s as if the Vatican has been taken over by Muslim saracens. It is not a political loss, or a setback in an ongoing political disagreement, but an unseating of a non-theistic religion which was in political power, and is still largely in social power. That is very traumatic for the believers in that non-theistic religion — similarly to how the failure of Islam to take over the world (and in fact, it’s eventual falling behind the Christian/Infidel West) was and is so traumatic for many muslims.

    For theistic belivers, and in the US that means almost always Christians, this conflict occurs on two levels — both with the secular non-theistic believers directly and then also interiorly with the aspects of themselves which are tainted with the new religion. This is primarily a spiritual battle, obviously. The problem is that it is not seen as one. It is seen as primarily a political battle, when in fact it is a spiritual conflict between the leading theistic religion in the US and the new non-theistic religion which has emerged. This is why it is proving to be so intractable (religious conflicts generally are, because mostly people are only satisfied with total victory), so bitter, so vehement, and so overwrought in terms of the reaction to this election. It’s a religious and spiritual conflict and in order to fight it, both within ourselves and in the broader context outside of ourselves, we need to understand that clearly and act accordingly.

  8. Pingback: The cult of diversity | Christianity and masculinity

  9. Zhou says:

    @ Deep Strength
    Could also be that many Christians today, even if genuine, just haven’t developed enough critical thinking skills. For instance, my friend would’ve voted in Hilary, and admits abortion is bad, but thinks that at least Hilary would be better for the economy (an assumption), and thereby shows a sort of consequentialist way of thinking (x is right if and only if it leads to the best consequences), even though the great Christian thinkers of the past have rejected consequentialism. But Christians have forgone this way of thinking or critical analysis. But, luckily there is a renaissance of Christian thought where apologetics has taken rise.

    Also, how do you quote someone?

  10. @ Zhou

    I think that is the case for some. For others they want to stay willfully ignorant or not change their mind because they don’t want to conform to the things of God.

    This is a failure of discipleship in the Church.

    Quoting is done by html tags with the brackets like . For quotes you do those with blockquote in them for the first one, and /blockquote in the last one.

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