Process oriented, not results oriented

As we have seen before, the Bible is desire oriented and not works oriented. In the failure of Chivalry in Biblical marriage, this was the point on works vs desire.

Works and desire in salvation and also marriage

Going back to a point I made several years ago now is the difference between works/performance and desire. The ideal is to desire God and His commands. Everything flows from this. The grace of God is what sanctifies us, but it changes us so that we desire to do good works.

When we try to “perform” or “work” we inevitably fail. As Christians, we know that works cannot save us: we cannot follow the Law good enough to achieve salvation.

Likewise, the same is with marriage. Working does not work. Biblical marriage is an image of Christ and the Church. The same standards apply to the husband and the wife. It is one of desire and not works.

  • You cannot work hard enough to placate your wife’s emotions (e.g. make her feel more attracted to you).
  • You cannot work hard enough that your wife will be pleased (e.g. do enough chores).
  • You cannot work hard enough that you will ever meet her expectations.

Falling into a pattern of works is falling into the temptation of sin. You are not trying to please her; you are trying to please the black hole that is unrestrained hypergamy. Your works will never be enough.

Part of the reason why works fail is fear. If you are working, there is a chance that you fail. If there is a chance that you fail, you will fear. If you fear man (or woman/wife in this case), you are not leading nor loving according to the Scriptures.

Does this mean that you shouldn’t try to please your wife? Certainly not. But it must come from desire and not working to try to please.

Maturity mode: Process oriented vs results oriented

When we get caught up in the work mentality, we also become very results oriented. We are working to get a specific result. We fall into the pattern of trying to game the system to get that specific result, and it often backfires on us.

God is clear that we are to be process oriented:

1 Corinthians 3:5 What then is Apollos? And what is Paul? Servants through whom you believed, even as the Lord gave opportunity to each one. 6 I planted, Apollos watered, but God was causing the growth. 7 So then neither the one who plants nor the one who waters is anything, but God who causes the growth. 8 Now he who plants and he who waters are one; but each will receive his own reward according to his own labor. 9 For we are God’s fellow workers; you are God’s field, God’s building.

We are to focus on doing our part to the best of our ability, whether that is planting or watering (placing the necessary conditions around the seed such as evangelizing or ministering or discipling), but it is God in the end that is going to get the result on earth (the seed to grow). We will be rewarded for our labor, but not necessarily here on this earth.

The problem with being results oriented in relationships or marriage is that we often or sometimes focus on the result that we want rather than taking into consideration all of the parties involved. This is true whether in marriage, with family, with friends, with colleagues or others. It’s also much more difficult to be excellent and show God’s love and fruit of the Spirit through our actions if we are too focused on the result rather than the process of building and caring for the relationship with the other person.

I think this is the one thing I have become much more aware of as I minister to other men and my wife. I need to be wholly there in the moment (and prior fulfilling my own walk with God and own needs so they don’t interfere), so I can focus on them to do what God wants me to do in that moment. I am not there to try to change them (results oriented) but instead to influence them in a godly manner through the Holy Spirit and the fruit of the Holy Spirit (process oriented).

It’s easy to moderately difficult to understand works and desire and have that be a focus in all your relationship. However, taking the next step to become more and fully process oriented rather than results oriented is truly difficult to extremely harder, especially when we deal with the harder situations of life. So many times we just want to change that other person because we have been through that experience or we have the foresight to know it won’t end well, but instead we just need to help them walk through in and influence them toward God.

I’m not fully good at this yet, but this is what I am aiming for in this next season of life.

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6 Responses to Process oriented, not results oriented

  1. Susan Cassan says:

    This is a profound post. Good advice for anyone , man or woman and in any circumstances where the opportunity to serve is present .

  2. Jack says:

    Your post says that “desire” and “process” should be pre-eminent. However, desire is usually for a specific state or outcome, which is presumed to be a result. Desire does not focus so much on the process. Likewise, works focuses primarily on the process, but with results as a goal. It’s easy to understand how working towards a result can become frustrating, but how does desire contribute to the process? It may help to clarify how one can achieve the “balance”.

  3. elspeth says:

    My take on how this works, since I think DS is making a very strong point here. When we focus on the desire to please God our Father, or in the case of me as a wife, the desire to please my husband, these are purer motives than acting because if an outcome that I desire. It makes the results less frustrating almost automatically.

    It is frustrating to work towards a result that I dsesire, and it is freeing to act on a desire to serve God or serve my husband. If God doesn’t respond by giving me what I think I desire despite my acting from a sincere desire to please him, my frustration is much less because I am left -ideally- with the understanding that He knows that what I desired is not what’s best for me.

    If my husband doesn’t respond in a way I desire despite my acting from a sincere desire to please him, then that’s on him, which might be somewhat frustrating but nowhere nearly as frustrating as it would be if I were striving towards my own ends. My particular man has an uncanny ability to intuit when my motives are selfish, no matter how selfless I might pretend that they are.

    The “balance” is almost baked into the cake. Delight yourself in the Lord and He will give your heart the things that it should desire is one way to interpret Psalm 37:4

  4. @ Jack

    Your post says that “desire” and “process” should be pre-eminent. However, desire is usually for a specific state or outcome, which is presumed to be a result. Desire does not focus so much on the process.

    Likewise, works focuses primarily on the process, but with results as a goal. It’s easy to understand how working towards a result can become frustrating, but how does desire contribute to the process? It may help to clarify how one can achieve the “balance”.

    I disagree. For instance,

    John 17:1 Jesus spoke these things; and lifting up His eyes to heaven, He said, “Father, the hour has come; glorify Your Son, that the Son may glorify You, 2 even as You gave Him authority over all flesh, that to all whom You have given Him, He may give eternal life. 3 This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent.

    Eternal life/salvation is about knowing God and Jesus (process), not about getting to heaven and avoiding hell (result). Most Christians get this confused because most of the Church gets this confused preaching that salvation is about getting to heaven and avoiding hell.

    Desire focuses on knowing God, and out of that the works flow (showing that you are indeed a Christian like Eph 2:8-10 or Titus 3:3-8).

    I agree that works can focus on the process, but more often than not will focus on the result, especially in dysfunctional relationships/marriages.

  5. @ Elspeth

    Good practical examples.

    I think all in all what we’re getting at here is the agape love in 1 Corinthians 13. Desire without reservation aimed at loving others embodies all those qualities.

  6. Jonadab-the-Rechabite says:

    There are two competing ideas summarized by the following aphorisms: The common “happy wife – happy life”. And the Biblical “fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom”. The former seeks a result by the never ending process of gynocentric living. In this philosophy the wife’s happiness is her lever of control over her husband as the ever present threat of her unhappiness means misery for her husband. In essence this idea is stated “happy wife- happy life” is the fear of your wife is the beginning of happiness. The biblical philosophy seeks not a happy wife, but the favor of a gracious and powerful Lord. This philosophy comes with a structure that places the husband in authority over his wife. According to the worldly philosophy the wife is the object of fear and worship, the Biblical philosophy the Lord is the object of fear and worship. Ironically men who live out their lives to please women rather than God usually please neither and more to the point, it really only matters that the Lord be pleased. If a wife is not content with a husband seeking to please his Lord, then she has rejected God’s order and lordship; she is not a helpmeet but a temptress.

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